Category: Presentation Training

How-To-Reduce-Public-Speaking-Fear-Part-Five.jpg

Three Physical Exercises To Help Reduce Your Speaking Anxiety

In the first four parts of our series about reducing the fear of public speaking, we focused primarily on creating a new public speaking mindset.

In this final post, we’ll shift the focus to three physical exercises — slow breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and aerobic exercise — that have been scientifically proven to be effective anxiety reducers.

I hope these tips help to build your confidence, reduce your stress, and make you (gasp!) enjoy the speaking experience.

Read More...
How-To-Reduce-Public-Speaking-Fear-Part-Four_thumb.jpg

Four More Ways To Reduce Public Speaking Fear

In the latest post in our series on reducing the fear of public speaking, you’ll learn four great strategies to help you feel more comfortable when you hit the stage.

You’ll learn how to rewrite automatic thoughts, reappraise your fear as a more positive feeling, contextualize your fear, and flip the formula to adopt a service-oriented mentality.

All four strategies might resonate for you. Maybe just one or two will. Read on, pick the ones that work for you, and get ready to use them in your next presentation.

Read More...
How-To-Reduce-Public-Speaking-Fear-Part-Three_thumb.jpg

Two Ways To Reduce Public Speaking Fear

How can you shift from being an anxious public speaker to a more confident one?

For most speakers, the best way to create a positive speaking mindset comes down to the three Ps: preparation, practice and presenting experience.

But there are other useful techniques and perspective shifts that can help you manage your public speaking anxiety, and this post will focus on two: managing the pernicious “imposter syndrome” and creating a positive counterbalance.

Read More...
How To Reduce Public Speaking Fear Part Two

The Public Speaking Mind-Body Connection

If you’re feeling joyous, there’s a good chance you’re smiling. If you’re feeling sad, you might be wearing a slight frown with downcast eyes and maybe even a few tears.

None of that is surprising. But what if the opposite was true? What if we were not feeling happy but forced ourselves to smile anyway? Could that facial adjustment—whether genuine or not—help transform our mood and “trick” our brains into thinking we’re happier than we really are?

Several fascinating studies say ‘yes.’ Here’s how to take advantage of that as a speaker.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger... Read More...